organicallygorgeous:

These drills look sick! 

#food  

#food  

Forgiveness = Health
It’s true! Everett Worthington, Jr., a clinical psychologist and author of Five Steps to Forgiveness: The Art and Science of Forgiving and a pioneer in forgiveness research has found that people who don’t forgive have more stress-related disorders, lower immune system function and a higher rate of cardiovascular disease and other illnesses. Those who have found a way to pardon the transgressions of others experience lower blood pressure, less depression and better overall mental and physical health than those who do not forgive easily.(Source: The Self Health Revolution http://ow.ly/hqnBE ) 

Forgiveness = Health

It’s true! Everett Worthington, Jr., a clinical psychologist and author of Five Steps to Forgiveness: The Art and Science of Forgiving and a pioneer in forgiveness research has found that people who don’t forgive have more stress-related disorders, lower immune system function and a higher rate of cardiovascular disease and other illnesses. 
Those who have found a way to pardon the transgressions of others experience lower blood pressure, less depression and better overall mental and physical health than those who do not forgive easily.

(Source: The Self Health Revolution http://ow.ly/hqnBE ) 

ucsdhealthsciences:

The challenges of adolescent obesity
In the quest to find new, more effective and long-term ways to address America’s obesity epidemic, it often seems like we’re losing more ground than pounds. Roughly one-third of U.S. adults are obese, with some researchers suggesting that percentage might climb to 44 percent by 2030.
Perhaps worse, the prevalence of obesity in American children is approximately 17 percent, with 3 to 5 percent considered to be severely obese. The vast majority of these children will become obese adults, likely beset by a host of obesity-related ailments and premature death.
The obstacles to discovering and developing new weight loss drugs for obese adults are huge. Successes have been few and relatively modest in effect. Indeed, the Food and Drug Administration only recently approved two new prescription anti-obesity drugs, Belviq and Qsymia, the first such approvals in more than a decade.
The task is even more difficult for treating obese children. Writing in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, Jeffrey B. Schwimmer, MD, professor of clinical pediatrics at UC San Diego and director of the Weight and Wellness Center at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego outlines the state of clinical trials for adolescent obesity, current challenges and what needs to be done.
First and foremost, he notes that assessing the outcomes of pediatric obesity trials, which have been relatively far and few between, is a work-in-progress. There are no universally accepted criteria for defining successful weight loss in children, whose gender, growth and development confound adult-based standards.
For example, does a change in body mass index (a common measure of weight loss in adults) mean the same thing in boys and girls?
Probably not.
“A 13-year-old who has a large increase in height will have a considerable advantage with respect to BMI change compared with a 16-year-old girl for whom only weight loss will yield a decrease in BMI,” Schwimmer writes.
Schwimmer observes that some researchers and some studies have tried to overcome the limitations of simple BMI measurements with more complex formulations, but that the relative scarcity of adolescent subjects, clinical trials and subsequent data limits their current usefulness, though this may be changing as the number of adolescent trials—current and planned – is growing.
Other challenges involve simply working with the targeted group. It’s hard enough to create effective, yet practical, interventions for adults, let alone weight loss programs that will work for children.
And there’s the language of weight management itself, which contributes to a negative orientation toward obese patients. Echoing the FDA, Schwimmer says weight management efforts need to move toward emphasizing better health and away from simply being “The Biggest Loser.”

ucsdhealthsciences:

The challenges of adolescent obesity

In the quest to find new, more effective and long-term ways to address America’s obesity epidemic, it often seems like we’re losing more ground than pounds. Roughly one-third of U.S. adults are obese, with some researchers suggesting that percentage might climb to 44 percent by 2030.

Perhaps worse, the prevalence of obesity in American children is approximately 17 percent, with 3 to 5 percent considered to be severely obese. The vast majority of these children will become obese adults, likely beset by a host of obesity-related ailments and premature death.

The obstacles to discovering and developing new weight loss drugs for obese adults are huge. Successes have been few and relatively modest in effect. Indeed, the Food and Drug Administration only recently approved two new prescription anti-obesity drugs, Belviq and Qsymia, the first such approvals in more than a decade.

The task is even more difficult for treating obese children. Writing in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, Jeffrey B. Schwimmer, MD, professor of clinical pediatrics at UC San Diego and director of the Weight and Wellness Center at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego outlines the state of clinical trials for adolescent obesity, current challenges and what needs to be done.

First and foremost, he notes that assessing the outcomes of pediatric obesity trials, which have been relatively far and few between, is a work-in-progress. There are no universally accepted criteria for defining successful weight loss in children, whose gender, growth and development confound adult-based standards.

For example, does a change in body mass index (a common measure of weight loss in adults) mean the same thing in boys and girls?

Probably not.

“A 13-year-old who has a large increase in height will have a considerable advantage with respect to BMI change compared with a 16-year-old girl for whom only weight loss will yield a decrease in BMI,” Schwimmer writes.

Schwimmer observes that some researchers and some studies have tried to overcome the limitations of simple BMI measurements with more complex formulations, but that the relative scarcity of adolescent subjects, clinical trials and subsequent data limits their current usefulness, though this may be changing as the number of adolescent trials—current and planned – is growing.

Other challenges involve simply working with the targeted group. It’s hard enough to create effective, yet practical, interventions for adults, let alone weight loss programs that will work for children.

And there’s the language of weight management itself, which contributes to a negative orientation toward obese patients. Echoing the FDA, Schwimmer says weight management efforts need to move toward emphasizing better health and away from simply being “The Biggest Loser.”

ucsdhealthsciences:

Parasitic giant roundworms (Ascaris lumbricoides) extracted from an infected Kenyan child. Photo courtesy of J. Gathany.
Worm limits
Being infected by parasitic helminths or worms isn’t just a Third World problem. It’s a global phenomenon. Example: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says an estimated 576 to 740 million people around the world are infected by hookworms alone. In the United States, the most common worm parasite is Enterobius vermicularis or the pinworm.
A new study in the UK, however, offers this upside to being infected: If you’re carrying one type of parasite, your risk of catching a second infection may be less.
Cardiff researchers analyzed data from school-age children in Tanzania infected with the most common forms of parasitic worms: giant roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides), roundworm (Trichuris trichiura) and the aforementioned hookworm, of which there are two species that commonly infect humans.
They found that co-infection is a very important risk factor, sometimes more important than any other factor, such as a child’s living conditions, behavior and gender. Sometimes the risk of a second infection increases with the first, but not always.
The discovery has practical import. It more fully explains the relative risks of co-infection – when a person carries more than one parasite species – and suggests that efforts to control infections may need to be fine-tuned so that resources are not wasted targeting the wrong things.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Parasitic giant roundworms (Ascaris lumbricoides) extracted from an infected Kenyan child. Photo courtesy of J. Gathany.

Worm limits

Being infected by parasitic helminths or worms isn’t just a Third World problem. It’s a global phenomenon. Example: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says an estimated 576 to 740 million people around the world are infected by hookworms alone. In the United States, the most common worm parasite is Enterobius vermicularis or the pinworm.

A new study in the UK, however, offers this upside to being infected: If you’re carrying one type of parasite, your risk of catching a second infection may be less.

Cardiff researchers analyzed data from school-age children in Tanzania infected with the most common forms of parasitic worms: giant roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides), roundworm (Trichuris trichiura) and the aforementioned hookworm, of which there are two species that commonly infect humans.

They found that co-infection is a very important risk factor, sometimes more important than any other factor, such as a child’s living conditions, behavior and gender. Sometimes the risk of a second infection increases with the first, but not always.

The discovery has practical import. It more fully explains the relative risks of co-infection – when a person carries more than one parasite species – and suggests that efforts to control infections may need to be fine-tuned so that resources are not wasted targeting the wrong things.

bpod-mrc:

Uro Septic
Cystitis is a cruel affliction. It has you crossing your legs desperate for a pee; and then when you go, it hurts like chilli in a wound. It’s an infection of the bladder – where urine is stored, until you’re prepared to release it – and is commonly caused by bacteria. Here E.coli bacteria (shown in yellow) are seen on a landscape of cells lining the bladder (shown in blue) where they are wreaking havoc. They are causing painful swelling and mucus secretion (strands shown in orange). Sometimes they irritate the bladder so much it bleeds and urine is coloured by red blood cells (disc-shapes seen on the left). Because they have a shorter and more easily infected urethra – the pipe leading from the bladder to the outside – women are more at risk. Drinking plenty of water can sometimes be enough to flush out a bladder infection, putting you back in control.
Written by Lindsey Goff
—

Image provided courtesy of Science Photo Library
Copyright Science Photo Library
Any re-use of this image must be authorised by Science Photo Library

bpod-mrc:

Uro Septic

Cystitis is a cruel affliction. It has you crossing your legs desperate for a pee; and then when you go, it hurts like chilli in a wound. It’s an infection of the bladder – where urine is stored, until you’re prepared to release it – and is commonly caused by bacteria. Here E.coli bacteria (shown in yellow) are seen on a landscape of cells lining the bladder (shown in blue) where they are wreaking havoc. They are causing painful swelling and mucus secretion (strands shown in orange). Sometimes they irritate the bladder so much it bleeds and urine is coloured by red blood cells (disc-shapes seen on the left). Because they have a shorter and more easily infected urethra – the pipe leading from the bladder to the outside – women are more at risk. Drinking plenty of water can sometimes be enough to flush out a bladder infection, putting you back in control.

Written by Lindsey Goff

medicalschool:

Development of the Human Embryonic Brain

This video from the the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) gives a good overview of fetal brain development. The fetal brain grows enormously during pregnancy, both in terms of its size and the number of neurons.

articulomortis:

mothernaturenetwork:


 The rise of superbugs called ‘apocalyptic scenario’ 





Not helping matters is that antibiotic drug development is at a virtual standstill as companies would rather develop more lucrative drugs for chronic illnesses.

articulomortis:

mothernaturenetwork:

Not helping matters is that antibiotic drug development is at a virtual standstill as companies would rather develop more lucrative drugs for chronic illnesses.